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grown significantly and as well as we've reduced our nuclear stops, both the united states and russia to the point they're smaller than they used to be, but certainly sufficient right now. those are strategies of an earlier era and we need to think about new policies. explain. >> well, yes, that's exactly right. we got out of the cold war by building more nuclear weapons because it scared the daylights out of the other side, and frankly it scared the daylights out of us. we're not going to get out of this situation by building more weapons. if we built 50 new missiles it would not have an affect on north korea, china or russia. we need new policieses. most forces have not been tested under realistic conditions in 20 years. it's basically junk in the attic. i'm not opposed to getting rid of most it. we need to put out declarations of what the united states will do to prevent others were using nuclear weapons. so i'm very much in favor of the declaration that we will never use nuclear weapons first. what that opens up if someone does use nuclear weapons, that suspends our pledge so we
society, and you look at this map and you look at europe and russia. >> yes. europe is not just a debt crisis. we've been narcissistically focusing on a debt crisis. it's the western extrim city of the super continent and most changes in europe over the mill len ya have come from the east. they've come from the influx of peoples throughout the east. and we thought we had defeated that with the end of the cold war, that russia was out of it. but that's not the case. precisely because this belt of countries from estonia to bull gary are right next door to russia. russia will continue to be a factor in europe's evolution. if you look at russia, it's half the longitudes of the world but it's got less people than ban ga desh. it's been invaded by poles, electricity yanians, swedes. so russia still requires buffer zones in eastern europe and the caucuses. vladimir putin is not the totalitarian eastern giant the western union paints him as. his ne-yo imperialism is a function of his jeep geographical insecurity. poland, here in blue, may emerge as the real pivot state because, again, there's
! >> the biggest geopolitical threat facing america you said russia. not al qaeda, you said russia. and the 1980s are calling to ask for their foreign policy back. (laughter and applause). >> jon: well, that was a little hackie. i mean that was -- that was a it will roasty. i wouldn't (bleep) your foreign policy with margaret thatcher's (bleep), come on! hickory dickory dock, your geopolitical understanding can suck my -- (laughter) sorry. that's -- no, please don't because then i'll do it again some night. (laughter) so the president had a good night. must have felt pretty confident because he was letting his professor or y'all side shine through. especially when it came to one country. >> we've created partnerships throughout the region to deal with extremism. in somalia, in yemen, in pakistan. >> jon: what? really? (laughter) pah-kee-stahn? really? suddenly you're a guy who's desperate to prove you once roomed with a foreign exchange student? (laughter) look, this is america, we don't use the pronunciation locally. we don't say may-hee-co or frahnce. mexico, france. pakistan. (laughter) all in
] and in russia. 7% of the world's energy is here. -- 70% of the world's energy is here. briefly on human-rights, i do believe actually the great difference between democracy and dictatorship is simply this -- a soft assets, but an important one. and it does not have human- rights that i necessarily proud of, but india does have accountability. china can only become a modern nation if it permits democracy and if it permits secularism, that is equality and presence of trade. until then, it can be successful, but not monitored. >> i want to say three things quickly. i want to follow up on the admirals' comments. it is remarkable to many in the u.s. military that the u.s. is not ratified the convention. we had it pretty sincere effort to bring afford to the senate. we worked a couple of the votes short. i think senator mikulski for her support. i hope we will be allowed to take that up again and get that done as a country. it is challenging to make the case we're making, which is that these potential conflicts over territory should be resolved on the basis of principles when the final conven
? the united states and russia or is israel going to give them up? doesn't seem likely. >> listen, this was first thought about in many speeches made by president ronald reagan back in the early 1980s. he made these beautiful eloquent speeches about it. this was his dream. he didn't accomplish it. there was a big summit where he was meeting with the president of russia gorbachev and so this was his dream and now we cut to today where president obama is pickling up the mantel and one of his first speech, the first in prague, he made a big speech about the elimination of nuclear weapons. in his first term, he accomplished passing the new start treaty. i do believe this is a passion of the president's, president obama's. there's a lot of things, he has a nuclear summit meeting in d.c. which pledged the elimination of nuclear weapons. >> cenk: they did this treaty and made progress. that's great news. i am curious really, like is zero possible? >> it absolutely is possible. again, to go back about five years ago they called the four states, they used to call the four mothersman, kissi
more if the world weather forecast. >> still in north eastern china and russia and north korea are looking at really heavy snow. some blowing snow that will be persisting across the region. this heavy peak is over but the winter storm is going to be lingering across the region for quite a while. across the rest of china high pressure system will be predominant in making things very clear but very cold. it's summer-like across the tropics. we have a tropical depression that formed over water. this is not likely to intensify. it will be moving in a westerly pass toward southern vietnam so heavy rain and gusty conditions will be impacting the coastal gions especially across japan. cold surge is on its way. tomorrow we'll be looking at really cold weather. western flake of this country will be looking at thunderstorms, gusts hail and tornadic activity. across sea of japan the waves will be high about five meters high. western japan not too bad but any precipitation here. higher elevations could turn to snow. this is due to the cold wave that i mentioned. 's going to be dominating m
china as well as southeastern russia and north korea are seeing heavy snow. we have a video from northeastern china. residents have been hit by heavy snow and sleet since saturday. more than 20 centimeters of snow have piled up in chow yen. drivers have run into serious traffic disturbances and widespread blackouts have effected the area. hundreds of green houses have collapsed under the weight of the snow. so yes, the residents are heavily being effected and travel disturbances continue to impact the area for the rest of today. let's pull back and show you here that the peak of the heav snow will be tapering off. however, the winter storm will be lingering across the similar regions for the next couple days. as for japan, we have a cold surge of air coming in. this winter pattern will be kicking in starting tomorrow and making things light across much of the eastern half of the continent. especially in sapporo. you may see the first of the season up north starting thursday. things are still going to be rough across northern japan. specially the western flank. gusty conditions ac
's recovering from her injuries in britain. >>> the leaders of vietnam and russia have agreed to talk sea trade talks next year. russian prime minister and his counterpart announced the plan on wednesday in hanoi. economic and trade cooperation between the two countries has been steadily rising. medved said he hopes to get an increase in bilateral trade, that would bring total trade to about $7 billion in 2015. the two leaders also agreed to boost military cooperation. vietnam is engaged in territorial disputes with china in the south china sea. it's keen to bolster defenses amid china's growing maritime presence. >>> and that's going to do it for us this week. thanks for watching. we'll see you again next week on "asia 7 days."
the world war iii. host: let's go to russia. before the elections, president obama was heard on a hot microphone telling dmitry medvedev that he would have more flexibility after the election. what was he referring to? host: -- guest: romney is sent one of his sons to speak to one of the aids of vladimir putin. policy someone gets frozen during an election. russian policy, in particular. president who was prime minister during that time and now is president again. the relationship with russia has been somewhat fractious lately. secretary of state hillary clinton accused the russians of ridding their election. there were concerned for these popular protests in moscow where there was great oppression by the government and who lashed out at the united states as well. -- and putin lashed out. one of the earlier policies was for a russian reset, and attempted to take a relationship that was good at one. that had turned very fractious and taken from a basic transactional relationship, just dealing with things as they came out, to building a new, strategic relationship in russia. that has so
four months. she landed in kazakhstan tonight along with astronauts from japan and russia. president barack obama monitoring the conflict in the middle east as he travels through asia. today in thailand, he said the u.s. is working with all parties to end violence. he made history becoming the first u.s. president to visit myanmar. the president wraps up his three-nation asian tour with a stop in cambodia. >>> state department updating hugh it deploys security for diplomatic facilities around the globe now. secretary of state hillary clinton and the defense department will monitor where forces are deployed so they can travel to help during emergencies, if needed. the change comes amid congressional hearings over how the obama administration handled security crisis in benghazi, libya. i'm don lemon. see you back here at 10 p.m. eastern. fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your
multinational meetings of countries who oppose the scheme, including meetings that took place in russia and the united states. the bill before us directs the secretary of transportation to prohibit u.s. aircraft operators from participating in this illegal scheme. the bill also directs appropriate u.s. government officials to negotiate a worldwide approach to address aircraft emissions and to take appropriate actions to hold u.s. civil operators harmless from the e.u. emissions trading scheme. the e.u. needs to slow down, carefully weigh its decision to include international civil aviation in its emissions trading scheme. a better approach would be to work with the international civil aviation community through the u.n. international civil aviation organization to establish consensus-driven initiatives to reduce airline emissions. i'm pleased to see movement on the part of the e.u. to work with international community at i.k.o. to seek a global approach to civil aviation emissions. while the post ponement for a year is a positive sign, it's not enough to ensure u.s. operators won't be n
here feel syria's main ally, russia, would find a solution to the crisis. >> the anglican church has a new leader. after a lengthy appointment process, the former oil company executive and current bishop of durham, justin welby, has been officially announced as the new archbishop of canterbury. he'll take the top job at the end of the year from dr. rowan williams. a short time ago, he told reporters he supports the ordination of women bishops, but he's backing the house of bishops' earlier statement which objected to same-sex marriage. >> i support the house of bishop statement in the summer in answer to the government's consultation on same-sex marriage. but i also know i need to listen very attentively to the lgbt communities and examine my own thinking carefully and prayerfully. i am alza verse to the language of exclusion. ove in the same way as jesus christ loves us. above all, in the church we need to create safe spaces for these issues to be discussed in honesty and in love. >> the soon-to-be archbishop of canterbury, justin welby, there. i'm joined by the bbc's emily buchanan
so without opposition. while it is true that russia and china did not interfere with the rest going into iraq in that way, the iraqi people did. the iraqi people were educated, mobilized. they had a big pharmaceutical industry, petrochemicals, and they were wired, educated. they inflicted damage along the u.s. military along the way, both from sunni and shiite. many iraqis never accepted the idea of a foreign occupation of their country, and it failed. the project for a new american century, formulated as a proposition that the u.s. could be an empire on the old british model, that crashed and burned because people are now mobilized, politically and socially. it was the lack of mobilization in the old 19th century, when people were not literate, were not connected with each other -- ok, and maybe the british empire could exist. but that is not the situation any more. what i am saying is, petraeus was sent to these countries with the project from the new american century, the big new conservative thinkers who thought up these kinds of projects for occupation and reformulation of coun
on in the distribution of the economy and china, conditions in russia. there are a number of problems anew environment. we have not developed a coherent approach because in the first term you learn your job. that is the challenge that the administration is facing. >> people look to the united states for leadership. they look to us because we have for so long been in a position where we've been able because of our resources and military strength, because of our values, we've been able to keep the peace. we have been able to make sure that enemies feared us and make sure allies could count on us. with we step back as we did during president obama's first term and i'm afraid we're going to do the next term ease back and you see when there a vacuum. people that don't share our interests diving into that vacuum. >> i traveled all over the middle east. every leader i talked to believe the united states is weak in leaving. they are having to accommodate to that eventuality. whether it be the saudis or you name the country they are accommodating to american weakness and withdrawal. that means that they accomm
, the stans, russia, china, all the countries that have interest in afghanistan. their calculus would be affected by our signing a bilateral agreement. >> so i think it is a very important answer. i have the same feeling. i think islamabad is the first capital that would be affected by the bilateral agreement. tying some elements of the pakistani government to terrorist groups. they are hedging their bets for what happens the day after we leave. if we're not leaving presumably, they lose that argument. but, you know, there is -- every situation is different. i can't help but relate this to iraq. nobody wanted our discussions with the iraqi government for a presence in iraq after our troops left to fail more than iran did. and in fact, they were working on that. the fact that it did fail and we have no continuing presence in iraq i think is part of the reason why iran's influences spread there and so incidentally has al qaeda re- emerged again. i think those are warnings to us about how important it is to do exactly what you have called for, which is to have a good -- much smaller but
diplomacy. this is something that really works. i try to expand it to russia, which i think is kind of a cool idea, but got shut down by the embassy. but at any rate, it's a great idea, needs to be bigger. used to be the chairman of the bbc. has been impossible mission -- and possible because this has to do two things at the same time that are very difficult to reconcile, although in my view it's an excellent job of records failing. number one, it is a tool of american foreign policy. number two, it is a real, journalistic institution that needs to abide by normal journalistic principles. so how can he do both of those the same time? well, it is hard especially if you have members of congress who don't understand what the law actually says. so i've actually come around to the view, which i never stated before and i kind of have resisted this for a long time. they really do think it needs to be much more -- needs to be brought into the broader foreign policy making apparatus of the united states government. otherwise i don't think it's going to survive. so i think that tension needs
look at the consequences for russia, this is not just a regional question. it is about the relationship with another superpower, with the u.n. i am sure that a good percentage of the people here, when bush acted to go to war without a un resolution, they were very uneasy, but now, we find people saying, "maybe obama should do it," for different reasons. it is not tied to the election. the election is not going to solve the problem for them. >> let me also say i agree, 100%. do not get me wrong. i do not think that us going in and invading is going to change perceptions. either way, there is going to be these perceptions. helping syria is by no means going to change the perception that we helped some countries because of resources versus others -- that we help some countries because of resources versus others. >> i see no such trend in the country. i just do not see any public support for it. i think shibley has got it right. intervention would make things worse for syria and for us. you ask what is going to look like in a year, and i push it out five years. i think we are looking at a c
. the legislative agenda this week includes discussion with trade of russia. live coverage of the house is here on c-span. also at 2:00 eastern live coverage of the senate as members resume consideration of a sportsman bill. off the floor this week members ofts congress will hold hearings on the terrorist in benghazi attack that killed leaders. and a meeting with president obama about fiscal issues. in a few moments a book tv event with paula brot we will. petraeus designed after an f.b.i. investigation uncovered an extramarital affair. then a forum with two med doll of honor recipients and the joint chiefs of staff retired general richard myers. several live events to tell you about tomorrow morning t. new america foundation hosts a discussion on how going over the fiscal cliff would effect the military, social security and medicare. that's on c-span2 at 9:00 eastern. at 10:00 eastern on c-span 3 looks at al qaeda groups in yemen. >> c-span invites middle and high school students to send a message to the president through a short video let the president know what's the most important issue he shoul
they think they know the end. world war ii, we start it tonight. we see it from three sides, britain, russia, the u.s. it's a whole other ballgame when you look at three interests. russian eyes, english eyes, chinese eyes. if you can see history and have empathy for others, other than yourself, you broaden your compassion, and you broaden -- we become a member of the world. of the global community. and this is what obama has not done. now, he's basically operating as an outlier now. you asked about our criticism, it's couched in the context of 120 years of history. we started in 1900, we end now. it's a lot. and we start -- we mentioned woodrow wilson, world war ii, saying america is the savior of the world, remember, after versailles. we show that this mission to be a global policeman starts a long time ago. but it certainly grows dangerous after the atomic bomb in 1945. >> it's a fascinating project. thoroughly enjoy the book. it's a riveting history lesson. you bring this stuff to life. and i commend you for it. >> thank you. >> the untold history of the united states is on showtime. the
of russia initially when they went there to help the russian people, one of the first things they did with the help of the russians to two extreme poverty. my question is, is a risk too much for us so that we would a sickly state thank you and to let the door his shoe on the way out. >> obviously an indonesian case, part of that is just their farm are sensitive to questions of faith and we are so it's not infrequent we would behave in a way that doesn't take into account adequately their cultural sensitivities. this happens all the time and life. what's the right thing to do if someone isn't appreciative you didn't do anything wrong. don't worry about it and sometimes that happens. i wouldn't hesitate to help people unless someone related to the recipient weren't helped by their own kind. i would like to help. >> and i could add something to the indonesian case, there's a thing that exacerbated the relationship that made us were challenging for the ambassador. i'm sure we were still there when he was president wesley had a a policy decision here in the u.s. regarding the military enga
it to russia which i think is a cool idea. i got shutdown by the embassy. it is a great idea. in needs to be bigger. the bbg has an impossible to is as to do twoeared things at the same time that are very difficult to reconcile. in my view they have done an excellent job of reconciling its. number one, it is a tool of american foreign policy. it is a real journalistic institution. in need to abide by normal journalistic principles. talking to both of those things? it is hard for those who do not understand what the law actually says. i have, around to the view that the bbg needs to be brought into the broader foreign-policy making apparatus of the united states government. other was i just do not think it is going to survive. i think that attention needs to be resolved one way or another pie. the way it works now is that we used to sit down a summit people from our state wants are twice a year and see what is on your mind? i hope when i was under the secretary of there was more guidance. i think there needs to be. the second thing is that there needs to be a reorganization of the bbg.
, potentially -- occasionally, and then russia. [laughter] and 70% of the world's energy is here. energy becomes so dray dramaticy contagious. what do you do? briefly over human rights. i do believe between democracy and dictatorship is this, a soft asset, but a very important one that why india does not record in human rights that, you know, necessarily be proud of, but they have accountability, and, therefore, i believe that whereas china could be a successful nation, it cannot be a modern nation, and it's only a modern nation if it permits democracy and if it permits secularism, the equality and presence of it. until then, it's successful, but not modern. >> james? >> three things very quickly. first, i want to just follow directly on the admiral's comments about the u.n. convention on the law of the sea. it is remarkable to many of the u.s. military that united states is not ratified the convention. we had a pretty sincere effort to bring it forward to the senate. we were a couple of votes short. i think senator my -- mikulski for the support. i think we can take that up again and get it don
that are of concern to the u.s.. when you look at the consequences for russia, i mean this is not just a regional question. it is about the relationship with another superpower with the u.n.. it's interesting, i am sure that a good percentage of the people here, when bush asked to go to war in iraq without a resolution we are very uncomfortable asking without the resolution and yet we find people now saying maybe obama should do it but for different reasons. i think it's a really big problem for the administration. it's not tied to the election. i think the elections and themselves have problems. >> actually a cautious approach example. >> let me say i agree 100%. don't get me wrong. i don't think us going in and invading, either way there are going to be these perceptions along with the perception of the positive images of the west i was helping syria is by no means going to change the perceptions that we help some countries because of resources versus others. i agree with that 100%. >> i think there's a growing trend in kind -- inside of washington to favor intervention in syria, some kind of
at the consequences for russia, this is not just a regional question. it is about a relationship with another superpower with the u.n. we are very comfortable acting with this, but yet we find people saying that maybe obama should do this for a different reason. so i think it is a really big problem for the administration. it is not tied to the election. it is not even a political type of election. >> let me also say that i agree 100%. don't get me wrong. i don't think that us going in and invading is going to change perceptions. i agree. either way, there will be these perceptions. along with positive it images in the west. helping syria is by no means going to change the perceptions that we have some countries because of some countries versus others. >> i think there is a growing trend inside of washington in favor of intervention. some kind of increased action. i see no such trend in the country in public opinion. i just don't see any real support for it. the bottom line is this is horrible, but the american military intervention there would make things astronomically worse for syria and f
at the consequences for russia, i mean, this is not just a regional question. it is about the relationship with another superpower with the u.n.. really, you know, it's interesting. i'm sure that a good percentage of the people here, when bush acted to go to war in iraq, were very uncomfortable acting, and, yesterday, we find people now saying maybe obama should do it for a different reason so i think it's a really big problem for the administration. it's not due to the electionment eng the election is not going to solve that problem for them. it's not a political -- >> actually -- >> a cautious approach -- >> exactly. >> i agree 100%, don't get me wrong. i don't think we could win; right? us invading is going to change perceptions, i agree, but either way, there's going to be these perceptions along with the perceptions of the positive images of the west. us helping syria is by no means going to change the perceptions that we helped some countries because of resources versus others. i agree with that 1 # 00%. >> i think there is a growing trends inside of washington in favor of some inter
a year ago, jenna. that basically saudi arabia and russia would vie for the number one spot but now it looks like it will be the u.s. although the report does warn, listen the oil and gas boom in the united states is still in its infancy but u.s. crude oil production is up 14%. now there are moves afoot to basically stop the development of the u.s. oil and gas industry. number one, this is what the oil industry is talking about. that basically the interior department is moving to shut 1.6 million acres in the west to oil shale development. it would leave open 677,000 acres open in colorado, utah and wyoming to oil shale development and another 130,000 acres to tar sands development in utah but there will be, separate from there, there is going to be a protest at the white house scheduled for november 18th by environmentalists who are upset about u.s. oil and gas production. they're essentially saying, look the glaciers are melting. it is an issue of pollution from carbon here in the united states. the nat-gas industry would say, wait a second, natural gas is lowering carbon emission
with president karzai of afghanistan, prime min stir in italy, king ab dull la ii, and president putin of russia, and the president of spain. with that, i'll take your questions. >> jay, thanks. a couple questions about the scandal that many of us are now covering, one specific and them a bigger picture one. general al help, learning more about questions about him, and the pentagon investigation, alleged behavior. does the president have faith that general can continue to lead the war in afghanistan during this critical period of time while under investigation? >> i can tell you that the president thinks very highly of general allen and his service to the country as well as the job he's done in afghanistan. at the request of the secretary of defense, the president put on hold general allen's nomination as supreme allied commander of europe pending the investigation of general allen's conduct by the department of defense ig. the president remains focused on fully supporting our troops and partners in afghanistan that general allen led so ably for over a year. the president nominated general dunfo
buy to bring russia to work out a deal with us to find solution to go forward instead of saying no, no, no, and no again. so i think -- i just want to make the point that paula also made as wonderful as, you know, the modern tools are, the world will not allow us to get away with just tools. we will need to confront these situations, and i think the moment is here where it is overdue, it is extremely urgent to try to find a way that will end the killing in syria not only because it has canings for israel and other countries in indonesia, but because it sits, of course, a terrible negative example to others bad guys in this region and elsewhere who will be encouraged if they can get away with these types of behavior if we don't act. so i think this is a huge challenge that we need to face. and the solution is not a military solution. it's a smart one. >> we have to wrap up soon. to get the conference back on schedule. two more comments here and back there to get them in. >> thank you very much. [inaudible] i'm the australia commissioner in australia. i'm afraid on -- [inaudible] i wante
be highly desirable to find a way to bring russia to work out a deal for us to say no, no, no i just want to make the point that as wonderful as all the modern tools are they will not allow us to just tools to consult the situations and i think the moment is here. it is over dewey and extremely urgent to try to find a way that will end the killing and syria not only because of israel and other countries in the region but because it sets a - example to other bad guys in the region and elsewhere who will be encouraged that they can get away with these types of behavior if we don't act so this is a huge challenge we have to face even is not a military solution, it is a smart diplomacy. >> we have to wrap up pretty soon but let me take two more comments from here and there. yes. >> thank you very much. my name is luis. i'm afraid i'm standing in for life defense secretary. i just want to make a point after having had a long period of being a diplomatic practitioner particularly in my part of the world in the china, asia, jakarta, they have some good news which i would like to throw in. there
lady liberty dad at this holiday season. rick: russia is warning nato against going patriot missiles near turkey's border with syria. they requested the support as fighting has begun to spill over into the territory. >> you can see this here on the border city, captured by the syrian rebels. armed groups and syrian government forces, targeting rebels and aleppo. fifteen people, including four children were killed. it also leveled a building in the hospital already suffering from six previous airstrikes. heather: israel and hamas claiming victory as the cease-fire appears to be holding. it keeps israel from deploying ground forces were targeting hamas leaders. it is stopping palestinians from launching rocket attacks. but both sides say they are ready to resume fighting if the deal breaks down. how likely is the cease-fire took hold? let's bring in colonel tony shirker. he is part of the center of advanced studies and an author of a great book. >> thank you for coming to join a. >> you're welcome. heather: happy thanksgiving as well. how long is this truce to hold? >> this was starte
to use the kind of diplomacy that i think would be highly desirable, to find a way to work with russia to work out a deal to go forward. i just want to make that point that paula also made. as wonderful as all the modern tools are, the world will not allow us to get away with tools. we will need to confront the situation, and i think the moment is here. it is overdue. it is extremely urgent to find a way to end the killing in syria. it sets a terrible example to other bad guys in the region and elsewhere if we do not act. >> we are going to have to wrap it up pretty soon, but we will take two more comments. >> thank you. in the australian high commissioner in ottawa. i am standing in for my defense secretary, but it is quite fun for me, if not for him. i want to make a point, having had a long period of being a diplomatic practitioner. particularly in my part of the world, indochina, asia, jakarta, our part of the world has different views. we know what has happened in china. thailand has sufficiently grown to no longer be a recipient of foreign aid. similarly, indonesia, which will sh
are up 25%, up 40%, russia up 80%. last week we took steps towards a new defense partnership with united arab emirate that could be worth more than 6 billion pounds to british industry. i want us to go further still. when i look around the world, i see countries like germany using overseas business that works to drive new business. in brazil, for example, 1700 members of the german chamber. 1700 members of the u.s. chamber's. how many does the u.k. have? just 240. we need to do all whole lot better than that. i have asked steven green, our trade minister to work at home and overseas to increase the quantity and quality of services offered, could relate to the smaller companies seeking to establish themselves abroad for the first time. he will begin within 8 million pound pilot and 20 keep markets and go on to lead a transformation that will change the face of british trade overseas across the globe. there are valuable markets out there that just have not received the attention from government that they deserve. places like to wait, vietnam, algeria, indonesia, rocco. we need to do more t
, first and foremost with a 49 capitals of the coalition. i also think the other capitals, iran, russia, china, all the countries that have interest in afghanistan. their calculus would be affected by signing a bilateral security agreement. more important, signing an agreement reflecting the commitment that was initially made in may 2012. >> i think it's a very important answer, and i have the same feeling, i think islamabad is the first couple that we affected by the pilots who could agreement, the whole argument refer to that part of the reason they continue to be tied to some elements of the pakistani government to terrorist groups like haqqani network and haqqani network and i is eyes, as they're hedging their bets for what happened the day after we leave if we're not leaving. presumably. they lose that argument. but there is, every situation is different, i can't help but relate this to iraq, that it seemed to me that nobody wanted our discussions with the iraqi government for our presence in iraq after our troops left to fail more than iran did. in fact, they were working on that,
be there beyond i had in mind, senator, first and, russia, china, all the calculus would be affected by a signing a bilateral security agreement. more importantly, signing an agreement reflecting well. >> i is and the others, i can't help it seems to me that they we have no continuing presence in iraq, nothing are warnings to what you were called for. which is to have a much smaller, me >> the leadership is that the afghan government is favorably disposed in a bilateral security agreement. clearly, the details both governments have come to both appear to be cautious and optimistic that we will be able to very. >> isn't keeping senator, i have i assessments my first question is do know what the command in that is interesting to me. a guy that's going to take over the command you had no impressions or ideas as to whether a troop drawdown issue between now and 2014? >> senator, have an understanding of framework in which that decision ought to be made. i certainly have identified the important burials that need to be made. i have not been involved in the detailed planning map so you are a blank slat
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